Arlesheim, Basel-Landschaft (BL), Schweiz/Suisse/Svizzera/Switzerland

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter;
Kodak Ektar 125 (Kodak 5101 | Ektar 125-1) 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, November 1991

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Vacation in Kelowna, B.C., Canada

Part of downtown Kelowna, Highway 97’s five-lane William R. Bennett Bridge crossing the lake to West Kelowna, and a southerly view of Okanagan Lake from Knox Mountain Park on Monday, July 22, 2013 at 12:14 PDT.

Evening glow after sunset from the balcony of our vacation apartment at 4058 Lakeshore Road in Kelowna on Monday, July 22, 2013 at 20:57 PDT.

Morning view from same balcony on Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 08:26 PDT.

Lala and I are enjoying a vacation in Kelowna, B.C., Canada from Sunday, July 21 to Thursday, August 1, 2013. So far, we have visited Knox Mountain Park for a small hike, the panoramic views, and snacking on semi-dry Saskatoons straight from their bushes, tiny dark purple-blue berries, a staple of First Nations people here and in the prairies, particularly the Cree and Blackfoot; a day trip to Summerland, Penticton, and Naramata with the weekly farmer’s market in Summerland (picnic of mennonite farmer’s sausage, Swiss rye bread, and apricots in the nearby park) and cherries, apricots, and peaches from an orchard in Naramata; and downtown Kelowna. I take a quick morning dip in the lake before breakfast and we swim in the lake several times a day; and enjoy good food, red and white wine, beer, coolers, tequila cocktails, coffee, and plenty of water.

Saskatoon is derived from the Blackfoot, misaskatomina or from the Cree, misaskquahtoomina. Other common names are serviceberry, juneberry, or in French, amelanchier. The bushes grow in slightly dry or open forest areas, preferring some soil drainage and sun, and can withstand a bit colder temperatures in sub-alpine regions. Saskatoons have a drier, slightly earthier, yet still fruity taste than blueberries.

[Nikon D3100 14.2 megapixel DX-format DSLR Nikon F-mount camera; Nikon AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 18–55 mm f/3.5–5.6G VR lens with 52-mm UV(C) filter; Nikon AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 55–200 mm f/4–5.6G VR IF-ED lens with 52-mm UV(C) filter]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, July 2013

Thursday, June 20, 2013

New Camera

After many months of research (product descriptions, specifications, reviews, and forums), and watching prices and sales at Kerrisdale Cameras, Broadway Camera, London Drugs, Costco, Best Buy, Future Shop, Black’s, Lens & Shutter, Staples, and The Source), I have purchased a new camera. I always knew it would be a Nikon, having previously used a Nikon FE2 for many problem-free years.

I now have a new tool in my stable, a 2010 Nikon D3100 14.2 megapixel DX-format DSLR Nikon F-mount camera, s/n 5119118; Nikon AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 18–55 mm f/3.5–5.6G VR lens, s/n 53867376, with 52-mm UV(C) filter; and Nikon AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 55–200 mm f/4–5.6G VR IF-ED lens, s/n 4081625, with 52-mm UV(C) filter. I found a great deal for $589.99 plus taxes = $681.39 at Broadway Camera in Lawnsdowne Mall, Richmond, B.C., Canada on Saturday morning, June 1, 2013. The package included lens hood, EN-EL 14 rechargeable Lithium-ion battery, MH-24 battery charger, DK-5 eyepiece cap, DK-20 rubber eyecap, BS-1 accessory shoe cover, BF-18 body cap, AN-DC3 camera strap, two smaller and two bigger Ferrite cores, ViewNX 2 CD, Quick Start Guide, User’s Manual, Reference CD, and Warranty; plus added extras of one LowePro Apex 140 AW soft camera bag and two 52-mm UV(C) filters worth about another $100.00 in total. The young Chinese university student was friendly, well-mannered, and knowledgeable. In addition, I purchased a 16 G SDHC memory card and an extra EN-EL 14 rechargeable Lithium-ion battery. From the Nikon FE2, I transferred a package of Kodak lens cleaning paper, a lens pen, and a blue vintage Nikon cloth.

Cameras I have retired are:
  • the camera I first learned the basics of classic photography, and still in working condition, a 1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319
  • long lost, a Rolleiflex 4x4 Baby Rolleiflex “Sport”, Model 4RF 430, TLR 127 roll film camera with Zeiss Jena Tessar 60-mm f/2.8 taking lens and Heidoscop Anastigmat 60-mm f/2.8 finder lens
  • long lost, a 1971 Agfa Agfamatic 100 sensor viewfinder 126 cartridge film camera, 42.1-mm f/11 lens
  • still in working condition, my ever-reliable 1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film F-mount camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter, thoroughly cleaned a couple of times since new in July 1985, but never an issue until summer 2012 when the “A” mode no longer functioned but still usable in manual mode; with the cost of film and processing these days, plus a possibly expensive repair bill, and the need for a compatible zoom lens as I no longer have the one I had in the 1980s, I reluctantly (at first) decided to move into the realm of digital SLRs
  • in recent years I used a Casio Exilim EX-Z20 point-and-shoot 8.1 MP digital camera, 38–114-mm f/3.1–5.9 lens, s/n 31002061A, until it was stolen
  • then, a Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens, s/n 51002451, not as good as the Casio

On my two blogs, WORDS & ROADS and WORDS & WINGS, I will start to post assorted new photographs, along with more photographs from the previous cameras in my stable.

Friday, April 19, 2013

Burrard Inlet, B.C., Canada in late May 1989

Crossing the Burrard Inlet by SeaBus between downtown Vancouver and Lonsdale Quay, North Vancouver, B.C., Canada in late May 1989. Looking back at Canada Place, Coal Harbour, and Stanley Park.

The ship assist/harbour tugs Charles H. Cates I (Z-Peller, built in 1986) and Charles H. Cates II (Z-Peller, built in 1983) at Cates Towing (C.H. Cates and Sons Limited), immediately adjacent to and east of Lonsdale Quay, North Vancouver, B.C., Canada

In the late afternoon glow

A SeaBus returning to downtown Vancouver

The ship assist/harbour tugs Charles H. Cates X (Z-Peller, built in 1987), Charles H. Cates I, and Charles H. Cates II 

The ship assist/harbour tugs Charles H. Cates VIII (Twin Screw, built in 1980), Charles H. Cates XVIII (Twin Screw, built in 1972), Charles H. Cates VII (Twin Screw, built in 1977), and Charles H. Cates X, with North Vancouver Ferry No. 5 in background, serving many years as the Seven Seas Restaurant until scrapped in 2002

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujichrome 100 (RD-113) 36-exposure colour slide film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, May 1989

Stephan Alexander Scharnberg in May 1963

Stephan Alexander Scharnberg at home in Lake Cowichan, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in May 1963

Father planted me a birth tree, a Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), in the front yard of our converted bunkhouse on Neva Road. It is still standing to this day at over 60 feet tall.

There are not too many photographs of me smiling. I was usually a serious child.

In summer 1965, we moved to March Road in Honeymoon Bay, a few houses from what is now the Gordon Bay Provincial Park gate. We moved to Duncan in April 1966, by which time I had a brother, Felix Hayo Scharnberg, and a sister, Anya Maureen Scharnberg.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan (ISO 125/22°) 36-exposure black & white negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, May 1963 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Thursday, April 18, 2013

CPR’s Pier B and Pier C, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada sometime in the late 1950s

CPR’s Pier B and Pier C, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada sometime in the late 1950s. This is now the site of Canada Place with its iconic sails, including the East Building, Vancouver Convention Centre, the Pan Pacific Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver’s World Trade Centre, and the cruise ship terminal. The East Building, Vancouver Convention Centre was previously known as the Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre.

CPR’s Pier B and Pier C were built in 1927 for the CP Steamships fleet, and other passenger and freight ships. The piers were replaced with the construction of Canada Place in March 1983, using some of the Pier B and Pier C pilings, and served as the Canada Pavilion for Expo 86.

© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1958 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011 

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Coal Harbour, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada in late May 1989

Northwest view of Coal Harbour, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada in late May 1989 with Stanley Park and the North Shore Mountains in the background. On the right are the black steel arches at Pier A3 where the CP Ships train ferries docked. The CP Rail yard is no more, built over, and the Coal Harbour area built up with condo towers, small businesses, restaurants, pubs, and hotels, and along the shoreline Harbour Green Park and a public seawall leading to Stanley Park. This is now the site of the West Building, Vancouver Convention Centre including Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, Unit #1 Burrard Landing, 1055 Canada Place, Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH/CYHC) with its seaplane docks.  

CP Ships ro-ro train/trailer ferry, Carrier Princess, at Pier A3. These days she serves with Seaspan Ferries Corporation, still carrying her name.

CP Ships ro-ro train/trailer ferry, Trailer Princess, at Pier A1 and Canada Place with its iconic sails, including the Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre, the Pan Pacific Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver’s World Trade Centre, and the cruise ship terminal, the former site of CPR’s Pier B and Pier C. Where the ferry wharves, Pier A, were located is now the east side of the West Building, Vancouver Convention Centre. The Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre is now known as the East Building, Vancouver Convention Centre.

Every Saturday for two years, 1976 and 1977, I awoke at 4:00 am, dressed quickly and gathered my backpack, ate a breakfast of overnight oven-heated multi-grain or oatmeal porridge, and then father or mother would drive me to downtown Nanaimo for the six o’clock CP Ships ro-ro train/trailer ferry, either the Princess of Vancouver or the Carrier Princessarriving at the dock and ramp with the black steel arches at Pier A3, situated right about where today sits the West Building, Vancouver Convention Centre and the seaplane docks of Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH/CYHC). I walked up the Burrard Street overpass to West Hastings, turned left and continued to Granville Street for one of the beloved, classic CC&F T-48A Brill trolley buses on the 14 Hastings route, stepping down near Woodland Drive, usually at Commercial, for the few blocks south and west to The Christian Community’s house on Frances Street.

Here we participated in our Confirmation classes, led with warmth and intelligence by Rev. Werner Hegg. The others in the group were Marius Krack, Andrew Rachel, Anna Driehuyzen, Celina Gold, Florette Snijders, and a Shields’ daughter. I alone would be invited for lunch prepared with love by Alsten Hegg, many of the in-season vegetables from their small garden plot behind the early-1900s three floor house—my favourite the swiss chard in a bechamel sauce. Sometimes I stayed overnight for the Sunday service, and on these occasions at times even riding the bus back to White Rock with Marius, to return with the Krack’s the following morning.

On the more frequent occasions that I returned home the same day, I would often stop at Famous Foods on East Hastings for one or more items that mother needed, or further along at Woodward’s with its famous red neon sign, the rotating W. I then continued on a trolley for the Greyhound bus depot occupying the full block bound by Georgia, Dunsmuir, Beatty, and Hamilton. From here I rode a coach to a late afternoon or early evening BC Ferry sailing, Horseshoe Bay–Departure Bay. The route was code-shared between PSL (Pacific Stage Lines) and VICL (Vancouver Island Coach Lines). Father or mother would wait for me at the bus depot in downtown Nanaimo, close by the CP Rail ferry dock.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujichrome 100 (RD-113) 36-exposure colour slide film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, May 1989

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

1968 VW Type 2 (T2a) Model 238 Westfalia and my son

1968 Volkswagen Type 2 (T2a) Model 238 Westfalia, Sophia, B.C. licence plate HAE-162 in the parking lot at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR/CYVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada in autumn 1994, likely late November



My son, Cohen Isaac Scharnberg (O’Connor)

Burkeville, a small community adjacent to YVR




1968 VW Type 2 (T2a) Model 238 Westfalia, VIN 238031515, Sophia, B.C. licence plate HAE-162
  • early 1968 VW Type 2 (T2a, “Early Bay”), second-generation, bay window camper
  • powered by a 1971 60-hp 1584-cc (1600) four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, dual-port air-cooled piston engine, engine coded AE and followed by seven digits (codes from AE-0-000-001 to AE-0-529-815)
  • Solex 34 PICT-3 carburetor
  • 4-speed manual transmission
  • sliding side door right side, left hand drive
  • seats five, sleeps four
  • exterior body colour scheme in L567 (46) ivory
  • upholstery in 45 medium grey 68
  • 14-inch wheels, double CV-joints
  • low front turn signals mounted below headlights just above front bumper
  • original Model SO-68/2 Westfalia interior: rear bench seat that pulls out to become a ¾-wide bed, rear deck mattress, storage locker under rear bench seat, clothes closet with vanity mirror and hanging rod and shelves aft of sliding door, adjoining linen closet, rear ceiling shelf cabinet, ceiling and walls insulated and wood-panelled in baltic birch, yellow vinyl seat coverings, vinyl-tiled floor, hinged folding dinette table, front rear-facing bench seat with storage area immediately aft of driver bucket seat and walk-through divider, 1.6-cubic foot cabinet with ice box and drain, white plastic sink with drainage and venting system and hinged lid/counter surface, 7.5-gallon water tank and manually operated faucet pump, catch-all shelf unit, front lid mosquito net pop-up roof with canvas tent, rear wall with zippered flaps and zippered screen openings, cot bed inside pop-up roof, rear luggage rack, removable children’s hammock for over front seats, two ceiling lamps (one each over sink and dinette table) of three 10-watt bulbs each, small ceiling light in centre of compartment, transistorized 12-volt 110–125 volt electrical receptacle with double outlet, 15-ampere AC cord for plugging into campsite receptacles, original bay window privacy curtain, original yellow and brown checkered curtains for all windows, and fully-functional louvered side windows with removable screens

She was purchased new from the official VW dealer somewhere in or near downtown San Diego, California, USA. I still have her original sales receipt, owner’s manual, and service manual—regularly serviced and stamped. She appeared to be based in Indio, Coachella Valley, California, USA.

While in my possession she still sported an AAA (The Automobile Club of Southern California) decal in bottom right corner of the windshield. She was a member of some surf club based in San Clemente, California, USA.

Imported to Victoria, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in the early 1980s.

Legend has it, this camper drove to the famous 1969 Woodstock Festival in Bethel, New York, USA and back to the West Coast. And that John Muir, VW mechanic extraordinaire and writer of the famous manual, How To Keep Your Volkswagen Alive: A Manual Of Step By Step Procedures for the Compleat Idiot, once serviced and tuned my baby’s 1600-cc engine.

I took Sophia camping many times: southern Vancouver Island, Saltspring Island, Hornby Island, Alice Lake near Brackendale up past Squamish, Hicks Lake near Harrison Hot Springs and Harrison Lake, Manning Park, and including a road trip to Grande Prairie, Alberta in August 1994, travelling up the Coquihalla Highway and Summit from Hope, then Merritt, Kamloops, Blue River, Valemount, Jasper, from Hinton through Grande Cache to Grande Prairie on Highway 40 (at the time still known as “the Highway to Hell”, the last year it was sand and gravel surface strewn with the debris of blown tires, pieces of wood, and branches, before receiving an asphalt surface the following year) to Grande Prairie, Alberta, then back by way of Dawson Creek, Prince George, Quesnel, Lac La Hache, 100 Mile House, Clinton, Cache Creek, Ashcroft, Spences Bridge, Lytton, down the Fraser Canyon, Hope, and back to New Westminster, B.C.

Alas, after owning her from 1992 t0 2000, I sadly sold her to a VW enthusiast-restorer-collector in Coquitlam, B.C., Canada, wanting to give her one more good life. At the time I was broke. I couldn’t afford the $10,000.00 or $15,000.00 restoration she needed and deserved.

I miss the camper. I would purchase another fine bay window model.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, November 1994

Monday, October 29, 2012

One Million Trees Planted in 1964!

Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg planting his millionth seedling somewhere on Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada sometime in 1964

This was a publicity photograph for British Columbia Forest Service. My father started his career as a tree planter for BCFP (British Columbia Forest Products Limited) in the Nitinat area on Vancouver Island, B.C. on April 2, 1956, for a short time resided at 1362 Comox St. in Vancouver, B.C. in January 1959 during a seasonal lay-off due to winter weather conditions, and then was based at the Harris Creek Logging Camp near Port Renfrew, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada on February 11, 1959. In the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s Uwe and his crew planted in the areas of Nitinat, Port Renfrew, Jordan River, China Creek, Koksilah, Kennedy Lake, Ucluelet, Tofino, Englishman River near Parksville, Caycuse, Mesachie Lake, Cowichan Lake, and Knight Inlet, while we lived first in Lake Cowichan and then Honeymoon Bay and later in Koksilah just south of Duncan, all on Vancouver Island. Unofficially, father holds the world record for the most trees planted by one person, over 2.5 million trees in twenty-seven years (Guinness Book of World Records), but Guinness did not have a category or the space for this, was apparently their written response to a query by BCFP. Uwe retired from the company in the fall of 1983.

Thursday, August 16, 2012

“Le Quercioline”

Agriturismo “Le Quercioline”, Strada di Marcialla 4/G, Tavarnelle Val di Pesa, Firenze, Toscana, Italia. Looking west-southwest, having just arrived at our vacation home of four weeks holidays from Friday, June 29 to Friday, July 27, 2012. Evening glow on Saturday, June 30, 2012 at 20:40 CEST (Central European Summer Time).

Sunday, July 1, 2012 at 09:47 CEST

At 09:48 CEST

These door bells, turned by hand, are still used

The beautiful hand-wrought iron above the main entrance at the ground-level patio

The restored farmhouse has two apartments, the main floor named Chianti Classico, upstairs named Gallo Nero

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens, s/n 51002451]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June and July 2012

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

5237 Koksilah Road, Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in spring 1969



We played outside spring, summer, autumn, and winter in sun, rain, and snow, seven days a week, usually from breakfast to supper, only coming in for lunch. Fresh air, exercise, creativity, and plenty of imagination was the foundation of our childhood. We lived in a 1938 cedar-shingle roof, cedar-shingle-sided bungalow, brown with white window frames, an earth-floor basement, and in later years the addition of a sundeck covering a garage of tools and the large room my brother and I shared; on 3.3 acres, front and back lawns, two big lower gardens cultivated along the principles of biodynamics, including an apple tree, a walnut tree, a few cherry trees, red and black currants, gooseberries, raspberries, a Japanese plum tree, and a mixed, dense woodland of first and second growth, home to a variety of flora and fauna including a B.C. Dogwood, Trilliums, snow drops, ferns, Big leaf maples (Acer macrophyllum), Western red cedars (Thuja plicata)Hemlocks (Tsuga heterophylla), Douglas firs (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Huckleberries, an Oak, a Ponderosa pine, Thimbleberries, edible and poisonous mushrooms, poisonous bright red berries, owls including a Snowy owl visiting several winters over the years, at least two varieties of woodpeckers, Rufous hummingbirds, black crows, a Raven, American robins, wild rabbits, pheasants, grouse, a full-grown Cougar passing by our basement bedroom window to trample through the gardens late one summer evening in the mid-1970s, a variety of small birds, butterflies and dragonflies, bees, wasps, hornets, many other insects, frogs, ants, garden snakes, Norway rats, Blue rats, house and field mice, over the years a succesion of cats and dogs including a Golden Lab/Retriever cross (Fix), two Chocolate Point Siamese (Rahsuh followed by Puss-Puss), a Dachshund (Douganette), a Dalmatian (Buffy), and more of both after we siblings moved out and away to new horizons, in chronological order, to pursue travels, diplomas, and trades in Switzerland and West Germany/Germany. 

In the background sit the Krack’s dark green 1968 or 1969 Datsun 1000 (Model B10) 2- or 4-door sedan, and the Scharnberg’s grey 1948 Plymouth Special Deluxe 4-door sedan and white & green 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 (T1c) Model 231 Kombi (Split Window Bus). Here are, variously photo by photo, front to back of the lines: Marius Krack, Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, Christina (Nina) Krack, and Anya Maureen Scharnberg / Marius Krack, Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, Felix Hayo Scharnberg, Christina (Nina) Krack, and Anya Maureen Scharnberg / Marius Krack, Felix Hayo Scharnberg, Christina (Nina) Krack, and Stephan Alexander Scharnberg in the front yard of the Scharnberg home at 5237 Koksilah Road, Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in spring 1969.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan ISO 125/22° 36-exposure black & white negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, January 2012

Monday, April 30, 2012

Hornby Island, B.C., Canada in summer 1969





On this particular visit Wayne Ngan, family friend and internationally renowned potter and painter, said that one day I would be an architect. I enjoyed many hours playing with pieces and cut ends of lumber such as 2x4s and 2x6s that Wayne used for his firewood, either in the wood stove or in the kiln. I built elaborate houses and castles, and tall towers. I never did become an architect as I had my sights set on becoming a bush pilot on the West Coast but instead later studied, worked, and lived in a Camphill Community in french Switzerland from 1982 to 1987, graduating as a Special Educator with a Diploma in Curative Education. This visit to Wayne and his family, and also to the other family friend, Heinz Laffin, another Hornby Island potter, was one of the first of many by the Scharnbergs in the ensuing 30-plus years, sometimes more than once a year. 


Anya Maureen Scharnberg, either Goya Ngan or Gailan Ngan, daughters of Wayne Ngan and painter Anne Ngan, and Felix Hayo Scharnberg at Wayne’s former home and studio on Hornby Island, B.C., Canada in summer 1969. In the background is the Krack’s bus, in the middleground the Scharnberg’s 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 (T1c) Model 231 Kombi (Split Window), and in the foreground, with passenger door and sliding door open, likely Wayne’s Volkswagen Type 2 Bus (Bay Window).

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan ISO 125/22° 36-exposure black & white negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, January 2012

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Fairy Lake, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in summer 1969

On a day road trip in our 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 (T1c) Model 231 Kombi from Duncan to Port Renfrew by way of Shawnigan Lake, the main branch logging road through Koksilah, with the famous suspension bridge that could support fully-loaded logging trucks, father at full speed down one end of the bridge, through its natural dip, and mit Schwung up the other side, and the Harris Creek Main. Here we are enjoying lunch with the Rachel family (their second son Andrew ? just visible at the start of this film roll), my mother Doris Scharnberg, myself Stephan Alexander Scharnberg (a few months shy of my seventh birthday), my brother Felix Hayo Scharnberg, and my sister Anya Maureen Scharnberg (our youngest sister Alison Oona Scharnberg joining the family just over a year later). Fairy Lake picnic site and campground near Port Renfrew, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in summer 1969.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319]  
© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Monday, July 4, 2011

more of Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1929–1937

My father, Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, was a student of Anthroposophy, a co-worker in Camphill, a biodynamic gardener, and a tree planter.

He was born at 11:40 in the evening of March 10, 1929 in the Schwedenschanze, a thatched roof hut near the Lower Saxon village of Höhbeck-Brünkendorf, Landkreis Lüchow-Dannenberg, Niedersachsen, Germany. Later this hut was renovated and updated into a café-establishment, in operation for many years until recent renovations and again enlarged, becoming a boutique hotel about 2007 or 2008.

Uwe’s parents were Moritz Johann Heinrich Scharnberg and Othilie Rott.

My father lived with his mother in a number of locations “all over the place” as he recently told me. These included Niedersachsen, Ribnitz-Damgarten in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern near the Baltic coast, and later in Hamburg. As a result, it was difficult for him to make and keep friends. This and his quiet, shy, and humble Piscean nature were a challenge to friendships throughout his life.

At three years old, Uwe was sent by train from Ribnitz-Damgarten to Ober-Beerbach, Hessen, southeast of Darmstadt, via Frankfurt am Main, alone with a sign on a string, showing name, address, and destination, around his neck. This was somewhat common practice in those days and through World War Two. Fellow travellers and train conductors could escort the child to his or her next train. In Darmstadt he was met by his Uncle Hans, husband of his first godmother, Cläre Dähke. The Dähke’s were involved in the Christian Community (Die Christengemeinschaft) in Frankfurt am Main and Darmstadt.

Also, Uwe went on a trip with his mother to East Prussia (Ostpreußen). 

He commenced school at age seven, only completing seven years plus one year Berufsschule (apprenticeship school). The Second World War interferred with the education of many German children. In those days the school year started at Easter.

Uwe was not often with his father. His mother was nicknamed “Schimmel” by her friends. She was born in Barmen in the Wuppertal. His father was known by family and friends as “Hein”.

My father, Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1929–1937

Schwedenschanze, near Höhbeck-Brünkendorf, Landkreis Lüchow-Dannenberg, Niedersachsen, Deutschland in March 1929.

My paternal grandparents were Wandervögel (Wandering Birds), the hippies of Germany in the 1920s. Othilie Rott with son Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, Moritz Johann Heinrich Scharnberg, and Freidi Heinrichsdorff (grandfather’s daughter out-of-wedlock from a relationship with Martha Heinrichsdorff), at the Schwedenschanze in March 1929.


Othilie Rott with son Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg in the Schwedenschanze in March 1929.


Othilie „Schimmel“ Rott, Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, and Moritz Johann Heinrich „Hein“ Scharnberg, at the Schwedenschanze on October 26, 1930.

Uwe with his mother in Hamburg in Easter 1931. Photograph by Julius Groß, Friedenstr. 63, Berlin (renowned photographer of the Wandervögel movement).

© Copyright photographs, Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1929–2010/Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, April 2010

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Before I was conceived and born

My parents, Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg and Doris Scharnberg, visiting friends in Victoria, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada at Christmas 1961. My parents lived on Pandora St. near Vancouver St. in Victoria at the time. They were newly married two months earlier in a civil ceremony in Victoria.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319]

© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, December 1961 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Friday, January 28, 2011

Confirmation classes, 1976–1977

Every Saturday for two years, 1976 and 1977, I forced myself to awake at 4:00 am, eat a breakfast of oven-heated overnight porridge, and then father or mother would drive me from just south of Duncan to downtown Nanaimo for the six-o’clock CP Rail ferry, the MV Princess of Vancouverarriving at the looming black steel arch dock and ramp, situated several blocks west of the former site of CPR Pier D that burned down on July 27, 1938 and was never replaced, west of the Convention Centre, Canada Place with its famous sails construction and cruise ship berths, and the Seabus terminal near the north foot of Granville Street. I walked up to West Hastings and over to Granville, boarding one of the beloved, classic CCF (Canadian Car & Foundry) Brill model T-44, T-48, or T-48A trolley buses, operated by BC Hydro, stepping down near Woodland Drive, usually at Commercial, for the few blocks south to The Christian Community’s house on Frances Street.

Here we participated in our Confirmation classes, led with warmth and intelligence by Rev. Werner Hegg. The others in the group were Marius Krack, Andrew Rachel, Anna Driehuyzen, Celina Gold, Florette Snijders, and a Shields’ daughter. I alone would be invited for lunch prepared with love by Alsten Hegg, many of the in-season vegetables from their small garden plot behind the early-1900s three-storey house—my favourite, the swiss chard in a bechamel sauce and the grated carrot salad with organic Thompson raisins. Sometimes I stayed overnight for the Sunday service, and on these occasions at times even riding the bus back to White Rock with Marius, to return with the Krack’s the following morning.

On the more frequent occasions that I returned home the same day, I would often stop at Famous Foods on East Hastings for one or more items that mother needed, or further along at Woodward’s with its famous red neon sign, the rotating W. I then continued on a trolley for the Greyhound bus depot occupying a full block bound by Georgia, Dunsmuir, Beatty, and Hamilton. From here I rode the coach for a late afternoon or early evening BC Ferry sailing, Horseshoe Bay–Departure Bay. The route was code-shared between PSL (Pacific Stage Lines) and VICL (Vancouver Island Coach Lines). Father or mother would await my return at the bus depot at the edge of downtown Nanaimo, close by the CP Rail ferry dock. 

Monday, January 24, 2011

My Cameras

There are four cameras I have owned and used over the years. 

In the summer of 1975, a couple of months before my thirteenth birthday, I purchased a Rolleiflex 4x4 Baby Rolleiflex “Sport”, Model 4RF 430, TLR camera at a local garage sale. I have no record of its serial number. They were produced between June 1938 and February 1941, serial numbers from approximately 622.000 to 733.000. It was black, came in its well-worn brown leather case with strap, but no accessories and no manual. This model had a Zeiss Jena Tessar 60-mm f/2.8 taking lens, a Heidoscop Anastigmat 60-mm f/2.8 finder lens, a Compur Rapid, 1–1/500 sec., T & B, shutter, and used 4x4 film, Type 127 (A8). Film transportation was done by a winding lever with a red window for the first exposure, on the back of the camera, and a counter window for exposures 2 to 12. A single lever under the taking lens both cocked and released the shutter. The back displayed a depth of field scale and exposure guide. It had a blank film pressure plate and a sports hood with a pop-up magnifier. My camera was obviously well used with care as everything still functioned just fine. Just the removable plug over the red window was missing. I believe I paid $5.00 for it at the time, likely quite a bit for a pre-teen with no allowance, saving money from collecting pop and beer bottles in roadside ditches and delivering The Times Colonist newspaper in a local trailer park. I purchased it from a former Koksilah Elementary school principal. It taught me the basics of photography. I took many photographs with this camera, mostly of airplanes at the local annual Duncan Fly-In at the Duncan Airstrip off Langtry Road, up the hill from our house on Koksilah Road, south of Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, and on most of the events with the Royal Canadian Air Cadets, 744 Cowichan Squadron, such as gliding at Nanaimo Airport at Cassidy, Vancouver Island, B.C., summer camp for Basic Training at CFB Penhold near Red Deer, Alberta, and a few field trips to NAS (Naval Air Station) Whidbey Island near Oak Harbor, Washington, USA and the Boeing 747 factory at Paine Field, Everett, Washington. I can not remember what happened to this camera.

In about 1978 or 1979 I had an Agfamatic 100 viewfinder camera given to me by my maternal grandmother, Ottilie Dapprich, who immigrated to Canada from Westdeutschland in 1977. I commonly used Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative film. I used it primarily for photgraphs of airplanes at the local annual Duncan Fly-In. Only a handful of the aviation photographs from the Baby Rolleiflex and the Agfamatic have survived. I can not remember what happened to most of these photos.

Sometime before graduating Grade 12 in June 1981, I started using my father’s Kodak Retina IIIS, rather heavy and very solid. I eventually inherited the 1959 Kodak Retina IIIS  rangefinder 35-mm camera, s/n 86125 (my father bought it new from the factory in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Westdeutschland where his sister Raphaela worked for a couple of years assembling these cameras). I still have the Retina in my possession to this day. It is due for an extensive cleaning and servicing. It still takes pictures but has become somewhat stiff in its use. It sports a Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro-Compur lens, s/n 6841319, and still has its original brown leather case, albeit the strap broke in the 1980s in Switzerland and was replaced with a wider generic aftermarket cloth strap. I also have the original manual in German, in well-used condition, but my father did not purchase any other lenses for it nor any accessories. The camera fell when the original strap broke, about four feet onto a dusty hiking trail in the Vaudois mountains. As a result, the lens received a dent at the rim, but no internal damage. I still took many good photographs with it until I purchased the Nikon FE2 in August 1985, from the proceeds of the 1968 Chevrolet Nova four-door sedan my parents had sold on my behalf the previous year.

On a four-week visit home from Camphill Perceval in St-Prex, Vaud, Switzerland, to my hometown of Duncan, I purchased a 1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm camera, s/n 1816483, with a Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and a 52-mm polarizing filter, and added a Tamron AE 80–210-mm f/3.8~4 CF Tele-Macro Compact Zoom (Model 103A) Adaptall-2 lens with a 62-mm polarizing filter, and a camera bag, all three items I no longer have, and a shutter cable and tripod, both of which I still use. Its previous owner was a local professional photographer who rarely used the camera. It came, rather oddly, with a manual in French, which I still also have and can read, as I am fluent in French. It has never had a repair, only a couple of cleanings, in its 26 years. But now, since a few weeks ago, the A (automatic) setting no longer functions. All other functions are still good. It will need to be repaired for the first time in its life.