Arlesheim, Basel-Landschaft (BL), Schweiz/Suisse/Svizzera/Switzerland

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter;
Kodak Ektar 125 (Kodak 5101 | Ektar 125-1) 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, November 1991

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Short day trip on Tuesday, March 17, 2009



Canada Goose crossing Cowley Crescent ... at home with the other birds! at 9:24 am.



1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, based at Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport (YXY), Whitehorse, Yukon; powered by two 2,190-shp Rolls-Royce Dart 7 Mk. 534-2 turboprop engines with variable-pitch four-blade Dowty Rotol propellers; crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, passenger attendant), 40 passengers, medium-range, mid-size airliner; built by Hawker Siddeley Aircraft Co., London, England; VQ-FBH, Fiji Airways, Suva, Fiji from 1968 to 1971; DQ-FBH, Air Pacific, Nadi, Fiji from 1971 to 1979, re-registered; ZK-MCJ, Mount Cook Airlines, Christchurch, New Zealand; imported in 1996; owner registered since August 29, 1996.

South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 9:33 am.



1950 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 81, C-FGQF, 839901 Alberta Inc., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed two-blade Hamilton Standard propeller; floats; pilot, six passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; CF-GQF, Rimouski Gulf Aviation, Rimouski, Québec on June 3, 1950; CF-GQF, Eastern Provincial Airways, Gander, Newfoundland; C-FGQF, North Coast Air Services Ltd., Prince Rupert, B.C. on October 15, 1990, cancelled on March 23, 1993; C-FGQF, Air Rainbow Ltd., Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, B.C. on March 23, 1993, cancelled on July 6, 1993; C-FGQF, Tsayta Aviation Ltd., Fort St. James, B.C. on August 6, 1993, cancelled on March 22, 1995; operated by Aero Aviation(?); C-FGQF, Castle Rock Exploration Corp., Richmond, B.C. on June 23, 1995, cancelled on December 1, 1997; C-FGQF, 598142 Alberta Ltd., Sidney, Vancouver Island, B.C. on August 7, 1998, cancelled on November 2, 1999; owner registered since August 28, 2000.

At 9:55 am.



1975 Cessna 180J Skywagon, c/n 180-52549, C-FPLR, Peter Beauchamp, Surrey, B.C., Canada and Neil Dennis, North Vancouver, B.C., based at Fort Langley Seaplane Base (CAS4), Fort Langley, B.C.; powered by one 230-hp Continental O-470-U six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed two-blade McCauley propeller; floats; pilot, five passengers, utility transport; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; N52192 cancelled on October 22, 1990; imported in 1990; previously sole ownership by Peter Beauchamp on January 10, 1991; owner registered since June 21, 2000.

1950 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 79, C-FOCY, “204”, Harbour Air Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH), Vancouver, B.C.; powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; floats; pilot, six passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; first flight on June 23, 1950; CF-OCY, Department of Lands and Forests, Government of Ontario on June 26, 1950; CF-OCY, North Coast Air Services Ltd.(?), Prince Rupert, B.C., crashed near Prince Rupert, B.C. on September 18, 1975(?), 3 occupants/3 fatalities, written off(?); rebuilt, rolled out in Vancouver, B.C. on November 22, 1976; CF-OCY, Burrard Air Limited, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., part of fleet end of 1979, cancelled on April 13, 1988; C-FOCY, Harbour Air Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. on April 13, 1988; took part in a movie as “N5886”.



1985 Apollo Sport 10 ten-speed touring bicycle, c/n 2106.

1954 de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Turbo Otter, c/n 42, C-GHAR, “308”, Harbour Air Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH), Vancouver, B.C.; powered by one 750-hp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34 turboprop engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; floats; pilot, ten passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; built as DHC-3 Otter, powered by one 600-hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S1H1-G Wasp supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller.

Dockside at the Harbour Air Seaplanes Passenger Terminal and Flying Beaver Bar & Grill at 10:11 am.



1958 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 1249, C-FAOP, Salt Spring Island Air Ltd., Salt Spring Island, B.C., Canada; powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; floats; pilot, six passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; CF-AOP, Algoma Steel Corporation Ltd., Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario on October 31, 1958; C-FAOP, Air BC, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., leased until 1982; C-FAOP, Framer Aviation Ltd., Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C. cancelled on May 27, 1982; C-FAOP, Tyee Airways Ltd., Sechelt, B.C. cancelled on May 17, 1983; C-FAOP, Brenco Investments Ltd.; C-FAOP, Thunderbird Air (1987) Inc., Sechelt, B.C.; C-FAOP, Baxter Aviation Inc., Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, B.C. on March 8, 1990; C-FAOP, Air Rainbow(?) in early 1993(?); C-FAOP, Harbour Air Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. on March 20, 1996; owner registered since May 28, 2004; www.saltspringair.com

I saw C-FAOP on Vancouver Island at Maple Bay, B.C. in summer 2007. At Seair Seaplanes Terminal.

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2009

Well, as it’s Spring Break this week for elementary and high schools, I only have my evening job to go to. My wife is at her job. This leaves me free in the daytime to do something for myself. It’s not often I get such an opportunity.

I still get up to feed the cats—male tabby Kitska, female tabby Sophia—make my wife’s lunch, cook our oatmeal porridge, and brew my coffee. The cats get raw turkey cut from the bone with heavy-duty scissors.

The wife left at her usual 7:45 am. I washed up the dishes, gathered together two cameras—my reliable (no repairs since new) 1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter, and the digital Casio pocket camera. Today I didn’t take along my 1959 Kodak Retina IIIS rangefinder 35-mm camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319 (my father bought it new from the factory in Stuttgart where his sister Raphaela worked, assembling these cameras). I shot 1½ rolls of Kodak Gold 200 colour print film at 24 exposures (half a roll already exposed in the FE2) for full-frames and close ups of my favourites such as de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beavers and Cessna 180/185 Skywagons. The digital camera covered some of the same (including all the photos in this post), plus signs, buildings, and groups of aircraft.

I left our house at 8:12 am, cycling west to Fraser Street and downhill along side streets to Marine Drive. I love riding my solid, reliable, black 1985 Apollo Sport 10 ten-speed touring bicycle, c/n 2106. Father bought it new at Russ Hays Bicycle Shop, 2542 Government Street in Victoria. He only rode it two or three times before he gave it to me about 1999–2000. He can no longer ride as his Parkinson’s worsens these last twenty-plus years.

The only other items with me were a pen and a small notebook. My old Cowichan wool toque, leather gloves, moss green wool scarf, blue Gore-Tex jacket, and thermal underwear kept me warm.

I didn’t have to wait long for the 100 Airport Station bus, the Nova LFS diesel, V9672, at bus stop #52211, 8:36 am, westbound on Marine at Prince Edward Street directly across from the Dueck Chevrolet Oldsmobile Cadillac dealership in South Vancouver. I hoisted the bike on to the rack at the front and boarded.

We crossed into Richmond over the Arthur Laing Bridge. We arrived at 8:55 am and I unloaded my bike at Airport Station and rode south toward the nearby BCIT Aerospace Technology Campus, 3800 Cessna Drive. Here I commenced with the cameras, snapping a few photos through the large windows, all retired aircraft in pristine condition.

Then, onward in the direction of the South Terminal of YVR (Vancouver International Airport, Sea Island)—the old original terminal, updated since my almost six-year-old childhood memory of flying from here in the summer of 1968 to Amsterdam aboard the 1961 Douglas DC-8-43, c/n 45622/137, CF-CPI, “604”, Empress of Amsterdam, Canadian Pacific Airlines; powered by four 17,625-lbf Rolls-Royce 508-12 Conway low-bypass turbofan engines; crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer), seven flight attendants, 132 passengers (dual F/Y class cabin), narrow-body intercontinental airliner; built by Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, USA; delivered on May 20, 1961; renamed from Empress of Calgary; sold to F.B. Ayer & Associates, Inc. on November 16, 1980; the Empress of Amsterdam spent 19 years with CP Air before being stored and eventually broken up at Opa-locka Airport (OPF), Miami-Dade County, Florida in 1988.

I stopped here and there, parking the bike on its bike stand kick bar, crossing ditches, ascending small hillocks of grass for the best shots I could get, over and through chain link fences, using both cameras, taking notes to be followed up and detailed later with internet research.

I devoted most of my time to Harbour Air, Seair, and the tarmac around the South Terminal. I also talked about 20 minutes with a Seair employee, discussing their fleet of Beavers, Turbo Beavers, and Cessna Caravans.

I was done a little after ten-thirty, face and fingers cold and a little numb from the constant cold wind. I packed away the cameras and cycled down the road, back to Airport Station to meet the 11:04 am 100 22nd Street Station bus, the Nova LFS diesel, V9689. I left the bus on Marine at Fraser, 11:22 am, crossing and pushing the bike a block uphill to bus stop #50820 for the Fraser Street bus, the 8 Downtown. The New Flyer E40LFR trolley, 2219, came along a few minutes later. It was a short trip up to East 45th Avenue. I was home before twelve. A lunch of beef ravioli and a cold glass of Warsteiner beer beckoned.

And I’ll end with this quote:

“When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.”
Leonardo da Vinci

3 comments:

Expat Traveler said...

Enjoy your time off and I just love the goose crossing photo! :)

karyn said...

Thank you for sharing your morning. I remember well, looking skyward as a child as my Dad flew over our house and tipped his wings to wave.
Your quote is fitting.

Paula said...

That is a good quote. Never heard it before!