Arlesheim, Basel-Landschaft (BL), Schweiz/Suisse/Svizzera/Switzerland

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter;
Kodak Ektar 125 (Kodak 5101 | Ektar 125-1) 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, November 1991

Friday, April 19, 2013

Burrard Inlet, B.C., Canada in late May 1989

Crossing the Burrard Inlet by SeaBus between downtown Vancouver and Lonsdale Quay, North Vancouver, B.C., Canada in late May 1989. Looking back at Canada Place, Coal Harbour, and Stanley Park.

The ship assist/harbour tugs Charles H. Cates I (Z-Peller, built in 1986) and Charles H. Cates II (Z-Peller, built in 1983) at Cates Towing (C.H. Cates and Sons Limited), immediately adjacent to and east of Lonsdale Quay, North Vancouver, B.C., Canada

In the late afternoon glow

A SeaBus returning to downtown Vancouver

The ship assist/harbour tugs Charles H. Cates X (Z-Peller, built in 1987), Charles H. Cates I, and Charles H. Cates II 

The ship assist/harbour tugs Charles H. Cates VIII (Twin Screw, built in 1980), Charles H. Cates XVIII (Twin Screw, built in 1972), Charles H. Cates VII (Twin Screw, built in 1977), and Charles H. Cates X, with North Vancouver Ferry No. 5 in background, serving many years as the Seven Seas Restaurant until scrapped in 2002

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujichrome 100 (RD-113) 36-exposure colour slide film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, May 1989

Stephan Alexander Scharnberg in May 1963

Stephan Alexander Scharnberg at home in Lake Cowichan, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in May 1963

Father planted me a birth tree, a Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), in the front yard of our converted bunkhouse on Neva Road. It is still standing to this day at over 60 feet tall.

There are not too many photographs of me smiling. I was usually a serious child.

In summer 1965, we moved to March Road in Honeymoon Bay, a few houses from what is now the Gordon Bay Provincial Park gate. We moved to Duncan in April 1966, by which time I had a brother, Felix Hayo Scharnberg, and a sister, Anya Maureen Scharnberg.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan (ISO 125/22°) 36-exposure black & white negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, May 1963 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Thursday, April 18, 2013

CPR’s Pier B and Pier C, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada sometime in the late 1950s

CPR’s Pier B and Pier C, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada sometime in the late 1950s. This is now the site of Canada Place with its iconic sails, including the East Building, Vancouver Convention Centre, the Pan Pacific Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver’s World Trade Centre, and the cruise ship terminal. The East Building, Vancouver Convention Centre was previously known as the Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre.

CPR’s Pier B and Pier C were built in 1927 for the CP Steamships fleet, and other passenger and freight ships. The piers were replaced with the construction of Canada Place in March 1983, using some of the Pier B and Pier C pilings, and served as the Canada Pavilion for Expo 86.

© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1958 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011 

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Coal Harbour, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada in late May 1989

Northwest view of Coal Harbour, Burrard Inlet, Vancouver, B.C., Canada in late May 1989 with Stanley Park and the North Shore Mountains in the background. On the right are the black steel arches at Pier A3 where the CP Ships train ferries docked. The CP Rail yard is no more, built over, and the Coal Harbour area built up with condo towers, small businesses, restaurants, pubs, and hotels, and along the shoreline Harbour Green Park and a public seawall leading to Stanley Park. This is now the site of the West Building, Vancouver Convention Centre including Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, Unit #1 Burrard Landing, 1055 Canada Place, Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH/CYHC) with its seaplane docks.  

CP Ships ro-ro train/trailer ferry, Carrier Princess, at Pier A3. These days she serves with Seaspan Ferries Corporation, still carrying her name.

CP Ships ro-ro train/trailer ferry, Trailer Princess, at Pier A1 and Canada Place with its iconic sails, including the Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre, the Pan Pacific Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver’s World Trade Centre, and the cruise ship terminal, the former site of CPR’s Pier B and Pier C. Where the ferry wharves, Pier A, were located is now the east side of the West Building, Vancouver Convention Centre. The Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre is now known as the East Building, Vancouver Convention Centre.

Every Saturday for two years, 1976 and 1977, I awoke at 4:00 am, dressed quickly and gathered my backpack, ate a breakfast of overnight oven-heated multi-grain or oatmeal porridge, and then father or mother would drive me to downtown Nanaimo for the six o’clock CP Ships ro-ro train/trailer ferry, either the Princess of Vancouver or the Carrier Princessarriving at the dock and ramp with the black steel arches at Pier A3, situated right about where today sits the West Building, Vancouver Convention Centre and the seaplane docks of Vancouver Harbour Flight Centre, Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH/CYHC). I walked up the Burrard Street overpass to West Hastings, turned left and continued to Granville Street for one of the beloved, classic CC&F T-48A Brill trolley buses on the 14 Hastings route, stepping down near Woodland Drive, usually at Commercial, for the few blocks south and west to The Christian Community’s house on Frances Street.

Here we participated in our Confirmation classes, led with warmth and intelligence by Rev. Werner Hegg. The others in the group were Marius Krack, Andrew Rachel, Anna Driehuyzen, Celina Gold, Florette Snijders, and a Shields’ daughter. I alone would be invited for lunch prepared with love by Alsten Hegg, many of the in-season vegetables from their small garden plot behind the early-1900s three floor house—my favourite the swiss chard in a bechamel sauce. Sometimes I stayed overnight for the Sunday service, and on these occasions at times even riding the bus back to White Rock with Marius, to return with the Krack’s the following morning.

On the more frequent occasions that I returned home the same day, I would often stop at Famous Foods on East Hastings for one or more items that mother needed, or further along at Woodward’s with its famous red neon sign, the rotating W. I then continued on a trolley for the Greyhound bus depot occupying the full block bound by Georgia, Dunsmuir, Beatty, and Hamilton. From here I rode a coach to a late afternoon or early evening BC Ferry sailing, Horseshoe Bay–Departure Bay. The route was code-shared between PSL (Pacific Stage Lines) and VICL (Vancouver Island Coach Lines). Father or mother would wait for me at the bus depot in downtown Nanaimo, close by the CP Rail ferry dock.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujichrome 100 (RD-113) 36-exposure colour slide film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, May 1989